EU proposes phasing out new internal combustion cars by 2035

Reading Time: 2 minutes

EU: The European Union has recommended that gas-powered internal combustion engine vehicles be phased out by 2035 as part of a comprehensive new strategy to substantially decrease carbon emissions on the continent.

The law, if implemented, would mandate a 55 percent reduction in overall CO2 emissions from new automobiles by 2030, compared to present levels. Currently, the EU only requires a 37.5 percent reduction by 2030, which is lower than even the United States’ aim. The EU, on the other hand, wants a complete ban on new gas and hybrid cars by 2035.

Because passenger automobiles account for around 12% of total CO2 emissions in the EU, the effective ban would be an effective measure for reducing air pollution. It would also provide a significant boost to all-electric vehicles and the firms who have invested the most in their development, such as Volkswagen, which has stated that by 2030, half of its total vehicle sales will be all-electric.

READ ALSO: Apple Announces AirPods Max Headphones – Starts At $549 For Pre-Order

To facilitate the transition to electric vehicles, the EU proposed on Wednesday that member countries establish public charging stations no more than 60 kilometers (37.3 miles) apart on major highways by 2025. By 2030, the EU anticipates 3.5 million new charging stations, with 16.3 million by 2050.

The EU’s executive body created the idea, which must be accepted by the full 27-country union. Some countries have already established strong targets, and a few automakers have outlined a timeline for phase-out of new gas-powered vehicles on the continent. However, there may be opposition. France, for example, is aiming to phase out internal combustion engines by 2040 and is looking for more flexibility on hybrids.

Outside of the EU, the United Kingdom has stated intentions to phase out new combustion engine cars by 2030, while California aims to do so by 2035. However, because it is home to many of the world’s largest automakers, the EU’s regulations are especially essential.

President Joe Biden has begun to reverse Trump-era decisions to reduce automobile emissions rules at the federal level in the United States. He moved to restore California’s ability to set its own requirements in April, and his administration plans to set average fuel economy standards of 51 miles per gallon by 2026 later this year.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: